Практикум по культуре речевого общения (первый иностранный (английский) язык).(2/3) тест с ответами Синергия

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37 вопросов с ответами

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Год сдачи -2020-2022.

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Оглавление

1 feel terrible. I think I … to be sick.

*will

*go

*am going

2. Read the email exchange on a website for jockeys, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. I am writing to ask you an important question. How do I become a jockey? I’m 16, 1m 56 and 49 kg. I've stayed this height and weight for a few years now so I don’t think I’ll get much bigger, if at all. I have ridden horses all my life. I don't mind working my way up. Tina Sander I’m afraid I have to tell you that there is no real career path. This can be an advantage as it means you will succeed if you’re good, but it also means it’s difficult to find out what’s required. Here are some of the most obvious requirements to help you. First, school! You don’t have to have any academic qualifications to be a jockey. However, you must have athletic ability and a lot of common sense. The next thing is your weight. Everybody knows that jockeys don’t weigh much and, ideally, you should weigh no more than 52.5 kg – that’s about 116lbs. Some people find it very difficult to stay light, and you do have to watch what you eat. Jockeys often eat no more than a piece of toast and a few cups of tea during the day. That isn’t a lot of food when you work very hard all day – and it’s a very long day too. Now, your height isn’t as important, although obviously if you’re taller, you may weigh more, and it can affect how you sit in the saddle. But there are some quite tall jockeys – one English rider is 1.7 m. You’re 16, so you are legally allowed to race in competitions. You can also join an apprentice school or a trainer at 16. In some countries, like Spain, you can start racing as an amateur at the age of 14. You didn’t say where you lived, so check out what your local rules are. Finally, and this is very important obviously, you must be a horse person. A jockey’s day …

* is very long and physical

*finishes quite early

*isn’t very hard

3. Read the email exchange on a website for jockeys, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. I am writing to ask you an important question. How do I become a jockey? I’m 16, 1m 56 and 49 kg. I've stayed this height and weight for a few years now so I don’t think I’ll get much bigger, if at all. I have ridden horses all my life. I don't mind working my way up. Tina Sander I’m afraid I have to tell you that there is no real career path. This can be an advantage as it means you will succeed if you’re good, but it also means it’s difficult to find out what’s required. Here are some of the most obvious requirements to help you. First, school! You don’t have to have any academic qualifications to be a jockey. However, you must have athletic ability and a lot of common sense. The next thing is your weight. Everybody knows that jockeys don’t weigh much and, ideally, you should weigh no more than 52.5 kg – that’s about 116lbs. Some people find it very difficult to stay light, and you do have to watch what you eat. Jockeys often eat no more than a piece of toast and a few cups of tea during the day. That isn’t a lot of food when you work very hard all day – and it’s a very long day too. Now, your height isn’t as important, although obviously if you’re taller, you may weigh more, and it can affect how you sit in the saddle. But there are some quite tall jockeys – one English rider is 1.7 m. You’re 16, so you are legally allowed to race in competitions. You can also join an apprentice school or a trainer at 16. In some countries, like Spain, you can start racing as an amateur at the age of 14. You didn’t say where you lived, so check out what your local rules are. Finally, and this is very important obviously, you must be a horse person. You must …

*get very good marks in school

*be fit and good at sports

*go to college

4. Read the text about science fiction, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. Many people think that science fiction really began as a style of literature with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, which appeared in the early 19th century. Two other great writers helped to shape the genre later in the century. The French author Jules Verne was a very important figure, and wrote many novels, which many people still read today. Well-known titles include A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and From the Earth to the Moon. He wrote about things which didn’t exist in his time – space travel, submarines, and aeroplanes. They were all ‘future’ ideas. The same is true of the other great 19th century writer – Englishman H G Wells. Probably the most famous of his novels is The War of the Worlds, where aliens attack Earth with very sophisticated weapons – it’s still so popular and relevant today that lots of films are made about it – the latest in 2005. Alien encounters are a common theme in science fiction novels, with many books set on different planets, or in a different time. Some authors write only about ‘science fact’ – this is known as hard science fiction. The authors write in detail about areas of physics and chemistry. Many of them have made very accurate predictions about future technology. Even something like Star Trek is well known for getting things right – when it started in the 1960s, doctors didn’t use scanners to diagnose illnesses, and mobile phones didn’t exist. And yet the characters used very similar objects – and at the time people thought they were just fiction – but now we use them all the time. Hard science fiction is often …

*very close to real science

*about physics

*set in a different time

5. Read the text about science fiction, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. Many people think that science fiction really began as a style of literature with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, which appeared in the early 19th century. Two other great writers helped to shape the genre later in the century. The French author Jules Verne was a very important figure, and wrote many novels, which many people still read today. Well-known titles include A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and From the Earth to the Moon. He wrote about things which didn’t exist in his time – space travel, submarines, and aeroplanes. They were all ‘future’ ideas. The same is true of the other great 19th century writer – Englishman H G Wells. Probably the most famous of his novels is The War of the Worlds, where aliens attack Earth with very sophisticated weapons – it’s still so popular and relevant today that lots of films are made about it – the latest in 2005. Alien encounters are a common theme in science fiction novels, with many books set on different planets, or in a different time. Some authors write only about ‘science fact’ – this is known as hard science fiction. The authors write in detail about areas of physics and chemistry. Many of them have made very accurate predictions about future technology. Even something like Star Trek is well known for getting things right – when it started in the 1960s, doctors didn’t use scanners to diagnose illnesses, and mobile phones didn’t exist. And yet the characters used very similar objects – and at the time people thought they were just fiction – but now we use them all the time. … people read Verne’s novels today.

*Some

*Lots of

*Not many

6. You’re very late! What time did you get … this morning?

*up

*back

*around

*away

7. Read the email exchange on a website for jockeys, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. I am writing to ask you an important question. How do I become a jockey? I’m 16, 1m 56 and 49 kg. I've stayed this height and weight for a few years now so I don’t think I’ll get much bigger, if at all. I have ridden horses all my life. I don't mind working my way up. Tina Sander I’m afraid I have to tell you that there is no real career path. This can be an advantage as it means you will succeed if you’re good, but it also means it’s difficult to find out what’s required. Here are some of the most obvious requirements to help you. First, school! You don’t have to have any academic qualifications to be a jockey. However, you must have athletic ability and a lot of common sense. The next thing is your weight. Everybody knows that jockeys don’t weigh much and, ideally, you should weigh no more than 52.5 kg – that’s about 116lbs. Some people find it very difficult to stay light, and you do have to watch what you eat. Jockeys often eat no more than a piece of toast and a few cups of tea during the day. That isn’t a lot of food when you work very hard all day – and it’s a very long day too. Now, your height isn’t as important, although obviously if you’re taller, you may weigh more, and it can affect how you sit in the saddle. But there are some quite tall jockeys – one English rider is 1.7 m. You’re 16, so you are legally allowed to race in competitions. You can also join an apprentice school or a trainer at 16. In some countries, like Spain, you can start racing as an amateur at the age of 14. You didn’t say where you lived, so check out what your local rules are. Finally, and this is very important obviously, you must be a horse person. Jockeys …

*are short

*are tall

*can be short or tall

8. At that … moment Mrs. Hilton told them that it was high time for everybody to go to bed.

*merry

*very

*worry

9. Fill in the gaps. I usually get . down on a bicycle - it's better for the environment than a car.

*up

*back

*around

*away

10. They were tired … having practice in listening and pronunciation.

*after

*under

*along

11. My colleagues usually … four days a week, but this week they … five days.

*work, work

*are working, work

*work, are working

12. Read the text about science fiction, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. Many people think that science fiction really began as a style of literature with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, which appeared in the early 19th century. Two other great writers helped to shape the genre later in the century. The French author Jules Verne was a very important figure, and wrote many novels, which many people still read today. Well-known titles include A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and From the Earth to the Moon. He wrote about things which didn’t exist in his time – space travel, submarines, and aeroplanes. They were all ‘future’ ideas. The same is true of the other great 19th century writer – Englishman H G Wells. Probably the most famous of his novels is The War of the Worlds, where aliens attack Earth with very sophisticated weapons – it’s still so popular and relevant today that lots of films are made about it – the latest in 2005. Alien encounters are a common theme in science fiction novels, with many books set on different planets, or in a different time. Some authors write only about ‘science fact’ – this is known as hard science fiction. The authors write in detail about areas of physics and chemistry. Many of them have made very accurate predictions about future technology. Even something like Star Trek is well known for getting things right – when it started in the 1960s, doctors didn’t use scanners to diagnose illnesses, and mobile phones didn’t exist. And yet the characters used very similar objects – and at the time people thought they were just fiction – but now we use them all the time. Science fiction stories are often set …

*in England

*in France

*on a different planet

13. Read the email exchange on a website for jockeys, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. I am writing to ask you an important question. How do I become a jockey? I’m 16, 1m 56 and 49 kg. I've stayed this height and weight for a few years now so I don’t think I’ll get much bigger, if at all. I have ridden horses all my life. I don't mind working my way up. Tina Sander I’m afraid I have to tell you that there is no real career path. This can be an advantage as it means you will succeed if you’re good, but it also means it’s difficult to find out what’s required. Here are some of the most obvious requirements to help you. First, school! You don’t have to have any academic qualifications to be a jockey. However, you must have athletic ability and a lot of common sense. The next thing is your weight. Everybody knows that jockeys don’t weigh much and, ideally, you should weigh no more than 52.5 kg – that’s about 116lbs. Some people find it very difficult to stay light, and you do have to watch what you eat. Jockeys often eat no more than a piece of toast and a few cups of tea during the day. That isn’t a lot of food when you work very hard all day – and it’s a very long day too. Now, your height isn’t as important, although obviously if you’re taller, you may weigh more, and it can affect how you sit in the saddle. But there are some quite tall jockeys – one English rider is 1.7 m. You’re 16, so you are legally allowed to race in competitions. You can also join an apprentice school or a trainer at 16. In some countries, like Spain, you can start racing as an amateur at the age of 14. You didn’t say where you lived, so check out what your local rules are. Finally, and this is very important obviously, you must be a horse person. Jockeys … during the day.

*eat a lot

*eat very little

*only drink

14. It was not difficult to … the question.

*decide

*settle

*terminate

15. The weather was … nasty yesterday that I stayed at home all day.

*so

*soon

*such

16. The economic situation is already very bad and it … worse.

*is getting

*gets

*would be

*getting

17. Read the email exchange on a website for jockeys, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. I am writing to ask you an important question. How do I become a jockey? I’m 16, 1m 56 and 49 kg. I've stayed this height and weight for a few years now so I don’t think I’ll get much bigger, if at all. I have ridden horses all my life. I don't mind working my way up. Tina Sander I’m afraid I have to tell you that there is no real career path. This can be an advantage as it means you will succeed if you’re good, but it also means it’s difficult to find out what’s required. Here are some of the most obvious requirements to help you. First, school! You don’t have to have any academic qualifications to be a jockey. However, you must have athletic ability and a lot of common sense. The next thing is your weight. Everybody knows that jockeys don’t weigh much and, ideally, you should weigh no more than 52.5 kg – that’s about 116lbs. Some people find it very difficult to stay light, and you do have to watch what you eat. Jockeys often eat no more than a piece of toast and a few cups of tea during the day. That isn’t a lot of food when you work very hard all day – and it’s a very long day too. Now, your height isn’t as important, although obviously if you’re taller, you may weigh more, and it can affect how you sit in the saddle. But there are some quite tall jockeys – one English rider is 1.7 m. You’re 16, so you are legally allowed to race in competitions. You can also join an apprentice school or a trainer at 16. In some countries, like Spain, you can start racing as an amateur at the age of 14. You didn’t say where you lived, so check out what your local rules are. Finally, and this is very important obviously, you must be a horse person. You must … to be a jockey.

*like horses

*find out about local laws

*say where you live

18. Read the email exchange on a website for jockeys, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. I am writing to ask you an important question. How do I become a jockey? I’m 16, 1m 56 and 49 kg. I've stayed this height and weight for a few years now so I don’t think I’ll get much bigger, if at all. I have ridden horses all my life. I don't mind working my way up. Tina Sander I’m afraid I have to tell you that there is no real career path. This can be an advantage as it means you will succeed if you’re good, but it also means it’s difficult to find out what’s required. Here are some of the most obvious requirements to help you. First, school! You don’t have to have any academic qualifications to be a jockey. However, you must have athletic ability and a lot of common sense. The next thing is your weight. Everybody knows that jockeys don’t weigh much and, ideally, you should weigh no more than 52.5 kg – that’s about 116lbs. Some people find it very difficult to stay light, and you do have to watch what you eat. Jockeys often eat no more than a piece of toast and a few cups of tea during the day. That isn’t a lot of food when you work very hard all day – and it’s a very long day too. Now, your height isn’t as important, although obviously if you’re taller, you may weigh more, and it can affect how you sit in the saddle. But there are some quite tall jockeys – one English rider is 1.7 m. You’re 16, so you are legally allowed to race in competitions. You can also join an apprentice school or a trainer at 16. In some countries, like Spain, you can start racing as an amateur at the age of 14. You didn’t say where you lived, so check out what your local rules are. Finally, and this is very important obviously, you must be a horse person. Many people …

*are amateurs

*work for a horse trainer

*go to Spain

19. I have lost my key again. I … things. I lose things too often.

*always lose

*was always losing

*have always lost

20. Fill in the gaps. When did you get … from your holiday?

*up

*back

*around

*away

21. Read the text about science fiction, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. Many people think that science fiction really began as a style of literature with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, which appeared in the early 19th century. Two other great writers helped to shape the genre later in the century. The French author Jules Verne was a very important figure, and wrote many novels, which many people still read today. Well-known titles include A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and From the Earth to the Moon. He wrote about things which didn’t exist in his time – space travel, submarines, and aeroplanes. They were all ‘future’ ideas. The same is true of the other great 19th century writer – Englishman H G Wells. Probably the most famous of his novels is The War of the Worlds, where aliens attack Earth with very sophisticated weapons – it’s still so popular and relevant today that lots of films are made about it – the latest in 2005. Alien encounters are a common theme in science fiction novels, with many books set on different planets, or in a different time. Some authors write only about ‘science fact’ – this is known as hard science fiction. The authors write in detail about areas of physics and chemistry. Many of them have made very accurate predictions about future technology. Even something like Star Trek is well known for getting things right – when it started in the 1960s, doctors didn’t use scanners to diagnose illnesses, and mobile phones didn’t exist. And yet the characters used very similar objects – and at the time people thought they were just fiction – but now we use them all the time. In War of the Worlds, H G Wells wrote about …

*submarines

*aeroplanes

*aliens

22. She was … tired that she couldn't go on working.

*such

*so

*soon

23. We always go to Saint Petersburg for our holidays. We … there for years.

*have been going

*are going

*were going

24. Read the text about science fiction, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. Many people think that science fiction really began as a style of literature with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, which appeared in the early 19th century. Two other great writers helped to shape the genre later in the century. The French author Jules Verne was a very important figure, and wrote many novels, which many people still read today. Well-known titles include A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and From the Earth to the Moon. He wrote about things which didn’t exist in his time – space travel, submarines, and aeroplanes. They were all ‘future’ ideas. The same is true of the other great 19th century writer – Englishman H G Wells. Probably the most famous of his novels is The War of the Worlds, where aliens attack Earth with very sophisticated weapons – it’s still so popular and relevant today that lots of films are made about it – the latest in 2005. Alien encounters are a common theme in science fiction novels, with many books set on different planets, or in a different time. Some authors write only about ‘science fact’ – this is known as hard science fiction. The authors write in detail about areas of physics and chemistry. Many of them have made very accurate predictions about future technology. Even something like Star Trek is well known for getting things right – when it started in the 1960s, doctors didn’t use scanners to diagnose illnesses, and mobile phones didn’t exist. And yet the characters used very similar objects – and at the time people thought they were just fiction – but now we use them all the time. Jules Verne …

*was writing at the same time as Mary Shelley

*came from England

*came from France

25. How long … this book? How many pages of this book …?

*have you been reading, have you been reading

*have you read, have you read

*have you been reading, have you read

26. Read the text about science fiction, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. Many people think that science fiction really began as a style of literature with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, which appeared in the early 19th century. Two other great writers helped to shape the genre later in the century. The French author Jules Verne was a very important figure, and wrote many novels, which many people still read today. Well-known titles include A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and From the Earth to the Moon. He wrote about things which didn’t exist in his time – space travel, submarines, and aeroplanes. They were all ‘future’ ideas. The same is true of the other great 19th century writer – Englishman H G Wells. Probably the most famous of his novels is The War of the Worlds, where aliens attack Earth with very sophisticated weapons – it’s still so popular and relevant today that lots of films are made about it – the latest in 2005. Alien encounters are a common theme in science fiction novels, with many books set on different planets, or in a different time. Some authors write only about ‘science fact’ – this is known as hard science fiction. The authors write in detail about areas of physics and chemistry. Many of them have made very accurate predictions about future technology. Even something like Star Trek is well known for getting things right – when it started in the 1960s, doctors didn’t use scanners to diagnose illnesses, and mobile phones didn’t exist. And yet the characters used very similar objects – and at the time people thought they were just fiction – but now we use them all the time. War of the Worlds …

*isn’t very relevant to our lives today

*is still very relevant

*isn’t very popular

27. The food that Ann is cooking in the kitchen … delicious.

*is smelling

*smells

*smelt

28. We always go to Saint Petersburg for our holidays. We … there for years.

*have been going

*are going

*were going

29. At 10 o'clock in the morning on Wednesday Tom …

*delegation in the office.

*will be receiving

*receiving

*would receive

30. We called our friends in London yesterday to tell them about the reunion that we …

*will plan

*were planning

*plan

31. What time … your friend … tomorrow?

*will, arrive

*is, arrived

*will, arriving

32. We were extremely tired at the end of the journey. We … for more than 24 hours.

*had travelled

*were travelling

*had been travelling

33. Read the email exchange on a website for jockeys, and choose the correct answer a, b or c. I am writing to ask you an important question. How do I become a jockey? I’m 16, 1m 56 and 49 kg. I've stayed this height and weight for a few years now so I don’t think I’ll get much bigger, if at all. I have ridden horses all my life. I don't mind working my way up. Tina Sander I’m afraid I have to tell you that there is no real career path. This can be an advantage as it means you will succeed if you’re good, but it also means it’s difficult to find out what’s required. Here are some of the most obvious requirements to help you. First, school! You don’t have to have any academic qualifications to be a jockey. However, you must have athletic ability and a lot of common sense. The next thing is your weight. Everybody knows that jockeys don’t weigh much and, ideally, you should weigh no more than 52.5 kg – that’s about 116lbs. Some people find it very difficult to stay light, and you do have to watch what you eat. Jockeys often eat no more than a piece of toast and a few cups of tea during the day. That isn’t a lot of food when you work very hard all day – and it’s a very long day too. Now, your height isn’t as important, although obviously if you’re taller, you may weigh more, and it can affect how you sit in the saddle. But there are some quite tall jockeys – one English rider is 1.7 m. You’re 16, so you are legally allowed to race in competitions. You can also join an apprentice school or a trainer at 16. In some countries, like Spain, you can start racing as an amateur at the age of 14. You didn’t say where you lived, so check out what your local rules are. Finally, and this is very important obviously, you must be a horse person. Your height …

*isn’t a problem

*is very important

*can affect how you ride a horse

34. We were good friends, we … each other for years.

*had known

*had knowing

*know

35. The family went... the railway station.

*to

*for

*in

36. It's necessary to … the rule before doing this exercise.

*realize

*recognize

*understand

37. Catherine is studying law at the university, and so … Nick.

*Is

*does

*was

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